Friday’s Faces from the Past and Some Friday Funnies


470 Erma and siblings

 

This was probably taken around 1922 as I have several pictures of my great-grandmother from that time that match her here. She’s on the right in the back row, with the glasses. With that, I assume the others are probably her siblings with maybe two of the girls as Arlene and Margaret, her sisters. The boys could very well be her brothers Kenneth and Clifford. Another girl could be her step sister Helen (who is  about the same age as Kenneth, the oldest of the boys) and then maybe a cousin? I’m not sure but that’s my best guess at the moment.

And because it is Friday…

Friday Funny

*I am working on fixing this problem of mine :)

Friday Funny2

*How my husband feels when I start to tell him about something I found

Friday Funny3

*I do find a way to do this in nearly every conversation :)

 

Have you seen this pinterest board from Geneabloggers? It’s quite fun :) Happy Friday!!

 

Have a good Friday everyone!!

Categories: ALMY, Photo | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: Another World

Theresa (KIEBEL) LANGENECK and her son, Frederick LANGENECK - probably in Vukovar

Theresa (KIEBEL) LANGENECK and her son, Frederick LANGENECK – probably in Vukovar

 

This was probably taken around the mid 1910′s – about one hundred years ago. It truly was another world then.

I just emailed a possible Kiebel cousin, so I wanted to post this picture although I have posted it before. Also, when I see my great-grandfather’s face, I can see my nephews in him. Those genes are VERY strong in my family and haven’t gone away in a few generations. I’m planning on getting a family picture with this side of the family over the holidays for comparison.

 

If you’re someplace like me where there are winter storms gathering, stay warm and safe! :)

Categories: KIEBEL, LANGENECK+ | Tags: , | 8 Comments

Tombstone Tuesday: Louis and Harry Raifsnider

Louis and Harry Raifsnider are brothers to my great-grandmother Ada (Raifsnider) Hummel. These two were the oldest boys of the family and probably felt a sense of duty to take care of the family. Louis, who never married, always lived with his mother. (1) He most likely helped out with his younger siblings since Ada, the youngest, was born when he was 15 and Eva, the second youngest, was born when he was 11.(2) More specifically, Eva died in 1915 leaving two young children, one of whom lived with Louis and his mother.(3)

Harry had married about 1907 to someone who already had two children of her own.(4) They later divorced and Harry moved in with his brother, Louis, and their mother by 1920. (5) What makes these two brothers even more special to me is that they took care of Thelma, Eva’s daughter, after their mother died. (6) Of course, I don’t know the whole story of Thelma and why her father didn’t take her in (he was remarried by 1918 and had a new family by the 1930 census [7]), and why Thelma’s sister, Irene (whom I recently discovered), was left with his mother.(8) Why did they separate the girls? Why didn’t the father want to keep the family together and raise them with his new wife and children? I don’t suppose I’ll ever know the full story; I can only guess based on records (which doesn’t look good for the father).

Either way, I love that these two brothers helped out their mother until she died and then took care of their niece like one of their own.

 

1) 1880 U.S. Census, St. Joseph County, Michigan, population schedule, White Pigeon Township, Enumeration District (ED) 203, sheet 17 (penned), dwelling 190, family 193, Hezekiah Raifsnider household; digital image,  Ancestry.com(http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 Nov 2014), citing National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T9, roll 603. Also, 1900 U.S. census, St. Joseph Co., Mich., pop. sch., White Pigeon Township, ED 128, sheet 2B (penned), dwell. 44, fam. 44, Minnie Raifsnider household; citing NARA microfilm T623, roll 742. Also, 1910 U.S. census, St. Joseph Co., Mich., pop. sch., White Pigeon township, ED 144, sheet 11B (penned), dwell. 135, fam. 137, Minnie Raifsnider household; citing NARA microfilm T624, roll 674. Also, 1920 U.S. census, St. Joseph Co., Mich., pop. sch., White Pigeon, ED 173, sheet 14A (penned), dwell. 179, fam. 184, Minnie Raifsnider household; citing NARA microfilm T625, roll 796.

2)1900 U.S. census, St. Joseph Co., Mich., pop. sch., White Pigeon Township, ED 128, sheet 2B (penned), dwell. 44, fam. 44, Minnie Raifsnider household; citing NARA microfilm T623, roll 742.

3) Michigan, “Death Records 1897-1920,” database and images, Library of Michigan (http://seekingmichigan.org : accessed 17 Nov 2014), entry for Eva Donahue, 9 June 1915; citing Michigan Department of Community Health, certificate no. 188. Also, 1920 U.S. census, St. Joseph Co., Mich., pop. sch., White Pigeon, ED 173, sheet 14A (penned), dwell. 179, fam. 184, Minnie Raifsnider household; citing NARA microfilm T625, roll 796.

4) 1910 U.S. census, St. Joseph, Mich., pop. sch., White Pigeon Township, ED 144, sheet 10A (penned), dwell. 94, fam. 96, Harry Raifsnider Household; citing NARA microfilm T624, roll 674.

5) 1920 U.S. census, St. Joseph Co., Mich., pop. sch., White Pigeon, ED 173, sheet 14A (penned), dwell. 179, fam. 184, Minnie Raifsnider household; citing NARA microfilm T625, roll 796.

6) 1930 U.S. census, St. Joseph Co., Mich., pop. sch., White Pigeon, ED 29, sheet 8A (penned), dwell. 200, fam. 204, Lewis Raifsnider Household; citing NARA microfilm T626, roll 1026.

7) 1930 U.S. census, St. Joseph Co., Indiana., pop. sch., Mishawaka, ED 71-81, sheet 10A (penned), dwell. 192, fam. 245, Arthur Donahue household; citing NARA microfilm T626, roll 628.

8) 1920 U.S. census, Branch Co., Mich., pop. sch., Coldwater Ward 4, ED 14, sheet 4B (penned), dwell. 113, fam. 119, Julia Donahue Household; citing NARA microfilm T625, roll 758.

Categories: RAIFSNIDER | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Christmas Truce

World War I has been talked about more than I ever remember this year for its 100 year anniversary. Because I have a direct ancestor that died during World War I whom I know little about, I have a much bigger interest in that war than in others. My great-great grandfather, Frederick Langeneck, died while fighting for Austria-Hungary.(1)

I don’t know much about him. He came to America about 1907 (2) and stayed in Pennsylvania where he married Theresa Kibel (also from Austria Hungary) on 17 Jan 1910. (3) Six months later, his son, my great-grandfather named Frederick (Jr?), was born. (4) That makes me wonder if they married because she was pregnant or if they had planned on getting married anyway.

Sometime shortly after his son was born, they moved back to Austria-Hungary. Maybe there was the rumblings of war that made him return? I’m not sure. I do know another son, Karl, was born while they lived there but that Karl died sometime while there as well (so says the family rumor and the fact that he isn’t with his mother and brother in 1920 or ever again). (5)

Theresa and Frederick Jr. returned to the United States in 1920 and went to Michigan where her parents and siblings had moved to from Pennsylvania. (6) She was marked as a widow on the passenger list.

That’s all I for sure know about Frederick. I wish I knew more. Sadly, Langeneck is a popular name in that area and so is Frederick so I haven’t been able to pinpoint his parents or siblings. Also, the records are in German and I have had some help with the translation but so far, nothing that has told me more.

I had heard the story about the Christmas Truce during World War I and I saw this video today. It’s based on real letters and diaries that describe that time. Although this video is a chocolate advertisement, the history and story behind this made me tear up. I couldn’t help but wonder if maybe my great-great grandpa was a part of this and wonder what he saw that night.

I love that stories from World War I are getting a bit more notice right now.

Here’s the video, tell me what you think :

 

 

1)“Verlustliste Ausgegeben Am,” 9 June 1916, vol. 1916, periodical, Kramerius National Library of the Czech Republic, Kramerius National Library of the Czech Republic (http://kramerius.nkp.cz : accessed 13 Oct 2013), Friedrich Langneck, p. 32

2) “New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 Feb 2014), entry for Friedrich Lenzeuck, aboard Kroonland, Antwerp, Belgium to New York, New York, arriving 5 Mar 1907; citing Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1897-1957; Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, National Archives at Washington D.C. microfilm publication T715, roll 0838.

3) Mercer County, Pennsylvania, Marriage License Docket 11:10755, 1910, Fred Longenick and Teresia Kibel, recorded license; County Clerk’s Office, Mercer; index and digital image, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 13 Nov 2014), FHL 004838956.

4)Frederick Langeneck, birth certificate [short form] no. 123372-1910 (1910), Pennsylvania Department of Health – Vital Records, Harrisburg.

5) Evangelical Church (Nova Pazova, Serbia), Central State Archive Stuttgart Taufen (Baptisms) 1900-1939, Karl Langeneck baptism (1916), FHL microfilm 1340294.

6) “New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957,” database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 Feb 2014), entry for Terezia Langenek, aboard Caronia, Cherbourg to New York, New York, leaving 20 Dec 1920; citing Supplemental Manifests of Alien Passengers and Crew Members Who Arrived on Vessels at New York, New York, Who Were Inspected for Admission, and Related Index, compiled 1887-1952; Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 1787-2004, National Archives at Washington D.C. microfilm publication T715, roll 2901, image 1138.

 

Categories: KIEBEL, LANGENECK+ | Tags: , , , | 10 Comments

Wordless Wednesday: Port Huron Summer Days

469 Granpa and two ladies

 

Ida Belmont and Ella Griggs with baby Bobbie Witherell making this taken about 1930.

Categories: Photo, WITHERELL+ | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Veteran’s Day: Civil War

I posted once before about some of my family members who have served in the military. My dad and grandpa weren’t part of any war but two of my great-uncles did fight in World War II. As I’ve dived into my family research, I’ve discovered more veteran’s in my family, specifically from the Civil War.

463 Judson and Nancy Almy

Since I have been diving into Civil War documents from my 3x great-grandfather, Judson Almy, I felt it was fitting to spotlight some of the Civil War veteran’s in my family. I’ve talked about Judson quite a bit but there was also my 2x great-grandfather, Hezekiah Raifsnider, who was also a veteran of the Civil War.

I really wish I had a picture of him! I spent some time at the White Pigeon (Michigan) library looking for information on the Raifsniders and found this photo:

453 Civil War in White Pigeon Library file cabinet labeled White Pigeon history a-l civil war folder

 

This was of the 11th Michigan Infantry, which Hezekiah was not a part of. He was a part of the 12th Michigan Infantry, but the idea is still the same.

Recently, a Raifsnider cousin contacted me to see if we are related (we are! I always love it when that happens!) and mentioned to me an article in the Sturgis Journal about a memorial going up in Wahbememe Memorial Park in White Pigeon, Michigan for Civil War Veterans. The first article, here, has a list of all of those from the White Pigeon community who served and whose names will be placed on the memorial. Hezekiah is there!  The memorial went up in September and now I have to make my way up there to take a picture. And one day, I will also order Hezekiah’s Civil War records… one day. :)

 

Thank you to all who have served our country; past, present, and future! Your sacrifices are remembered.

 

Categories: ALMY, History, RAIFSNIDER | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Friday’s Faces from the Past

468 Betty Shaw and her mom

 

This is from my grandmother’s (Mary (Hummel) Witherell) collection, so I’m assuming the younger woman is someone she knows. This was taken in 1944 and the caption is Betty + (her mom) Shaw [that is how it is written - I think it's supposed to be Betty Shaw and her mom]. I am not sure who Betty Shaw is though. A friend? A girlfriend of one of her brothers? A cousin?

Categories: HUMMEL, Photo | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Wordless Wednesday: Newlywed Christmas

467 1951 Christmas

This was the Christmas after my grandparents got married. I LOVE my grandmother’s outfit here!

Categories: WITHERELL+ | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Tuesday’s Tip: 5-Minute Finds

466 ancestry five minute finds

Some of you may already know about the 5-Minute Find Series on Ancestry’s YouTube channel, but I just found out about it this past week.

One of the genealogy groups I belong to hosts a different class about once a month on a topic of the participants choosing (which is decided in advance of course). This past one was 5 minute finds and I was surprised at how much information you can get in just five minutes!

The 5-Minute Finds Series is hosted by Ancestry so it does have to do with Ancestry’s records. Most people have access to these records through either their own subscription or through their library but I realize it’s not everyone’s go-to source. I use Ancestry quite often so I found this series to be useful. Some items I had already figured out through classes, forums, blogs, doing it myself, etc. but I do believe there is probably something for everyone in this series!

You can check it out here to see the list of 5-Minute Find videos.

 

Happy Tuesday everyone! :)

Categories: Discovery | Tags: , | 3 Comments

Mystery Monday: Stalmacher

My 2nd great-grandfather must have enjoyed messing with future generations. Well no, not really, but sometimes I feel that way because I can’t go further back then him. I cannot pinpoint exactly where he came from, when he came here, or even who he came with!

John Stalmacher on the far right; Ellen (my great-grandmother) is on the far right. In the car is Edna holding Priscilla, their youngest

John Stalmacher on the far right; Ellen (my great-grandmother) is on the far right. In the car is Edna holding Priscilla, their youngest

I’ll start with the beginning of John Stalmacher’s records. I found what I think to be him in 1910, living as a boarder in Jackson, MI. His birthplace is listed as Russ-Polish and his language is listed as Polish. His immigration year is a bit hard to read but it is probably 1900, which would mean that he was about nine years old when he came over so he most likely came with family.[1]

His World War I draft card, which I can at least confirm is his, also listed that he was from Russian-Polen and that he was a subject of Russia.[2] Unfortunately, he did not give a city name or immigration date.

In the 1920, sadly, the immigration year is listed as unknown but he is still an alien (as is his wife, interestingly enough even though she was born in America – there was a great session at the National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair about that!). He is once more listed as speaking Polish and said he was born in Russia but his parents are from Poland.[3]

So at this point, Poland is the main country. I know there were enough times that the border with Russia and Poland changed so I assume most of these switches as being from Russia or Poland have to do with where the border was when the document was created. However, since his main language is always listed as Polish, it seems likely he was from Poland, not Russia.

The 1930 and 1940 census show that as well. In the 1930 census is states he was born in Poland, and in 1940 he was born in Russia. The 1930 census does come through a bit more for me as it states he had finally naturalized and the immigration year is written as 1905.[4] Those are big clues are where to look next! Or would be. At this point, I have not yet found his passenger record or naturalization record. So I still don’t know where to look for his parents. Not even his obituary is helpful and only mentions that he was from Russia.[5]

So I’m left with a bit of a mystery – when did he come over? I know he had a brother here but what about parents? Other family? Where exactly did he come from? And then, of course, why did he come here?

 

[1] 1910 U.S. census, Jackson County, Michigan, population schedule, Jackson Ward 1, sheet 13A, Enumeration District (ED) 8, dwelling 258, family 328, John Stolanger; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 November 2014), citing National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T624, roll 653.

[2] “World War I Draft Registration cards, 1917-1918,” entry for John Stalmacher, no. 61 (penned), 1037 (stamped), Saginaw County; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 November 2014), citing World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, National Archives microfilm publication M1509, roll 1682811.

[3] 1920 U.S. census, Saginaw Co., Mich., pop. sch., Carrollton Township, sheet 12B, ED 156, dwell. 194, fam. 209, John Stalmacher; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 November 2014), citing NARA microfilm T625, roll 793.

[4] 1930 U.S. census, Saginaw Co., Mich., pop. sch. Carrollton Township, sheet 11A, ED 10, dwell. 234, fam. 248, John Stalmacher; citing NARA microfilm T626, roll 1021. Also, 1940 U.S. census, Saginaw Co., Mich., pop. sch., Saginaw Ward 11, sheet 17B, ED 73-46B, dwell. 332, John Stalmacher; citing NARA microfilm T627, roll 1813.

[5] John Stalmacher Obituary, Saginaw News (Saginaw, Michigan), 31 March 1952, p. 27.

Categories: Research, STALMACHER | Tags: , | 2 Comments

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